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Three Powerful Words

Posted by Jason Lauritsen on 22 September 2011

This post by Jason Lauritsen is ‘magic’ – It’s on me. That’s what a leader says when things go wrong.

It reminds me of one of the current inspirationl leaders in Queensland Health at the moment. This person is Dr Adrian Nowitzke, the CEO of the Gold Coast Health Service District. Part of his leadership philosophy is about what is outlined below regarding the Boston Red Sox Baseball Team. Read on ……

Earlier this week, the Boston Red Sox lost an important game.  They had been in a position to win when they brought in their ace closing pitcher, Jonathan Papelbon to pitch the last 5 outs of the game.  Papelbon generally closes out the last 3 outs of the game and he had successfully saved the game in 30 or his last 31 chances.  But, this time was different.  Things didn’t go well for Papelbon and the Red Sox lost the game.

After the game, here’s what Papelbon said about the game:

“Unacceptable,” Papelbon said. “The way I’ve been throwing the ball, I’ve got to go out there and execute. I didn’t do that, and by me not going out there and executing 0-2 pitches, I let my team down. I’ll shoulder that and take full responsibility, and I’ll be ready to go tomorrow. It’s plain and simple.” 

Those are the words of a leader.  Certainly, Papelbon’s performance had a major impact on the outcome of the game, but he wasn’t the only reason they lost.  Had the team scored more runs, they would have won.  Had the Rex Sox played a little better defense overall, they would have won.  But, Papelbon didn’t point at any of that.  He pointed to himself and said, “It’s on me.”  He took more than his share of the blame for this loss which is what leaders do.  He took the blame for the loss so the team could move on.  And it makes me respect him as a leader, and I’m guessing his teammates feel the same way.

 Next time things go wrong, instead of looking around for who’s to blame, try these three words.

“It’s on me.”

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