• The HR Architect Tony Wiggins

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    PO Box 551
    Everton Park Queensland, Australia 4053

    M: 0401458 573
    E: thehrarchitect@optusnet.com.au

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NFP People Conference Melbourne 2013

NFP-conference

Introduction

Passionate people are the fabric of what makes the third sector work and that attracting, training and retaining extraordinary staff and volunteers is more important that ever for NFP (Not For Profit) organisations (Michael Cebon, General Manager and Founder Ethical Jobs).

Snapshot

The conference took place in Melbourne on 27-28 August 2013 with over 30 great speakers from across Australia and beyond presenting to over 200 attendees.

The conference presented the latest trends and forecasts to assist HR managers in making more informed and effective HR decisions.  General topics covered:

  • Best practice recruitment
  • Leadership & training – prepare staff to take on future leadership roles and access essential training;
  • Managing people well – inspire your team to perform and deal with challenges in the workplace
  • Health & wellbeing – implement workplace health and wellbeing strategies
  • HR’s place in organisational strategy – ideas to improve your organisation’s culture to help keep staff for longer.

Setting the Scene

The Health and Community Services Workforce is predicted to grow by up to 77% over the next 12 years to 2025, according to a new report from the government funded Community Services and Health Industry Skills Council.  But that growth will bring “dire, unprecedented workforce challenges” without urgent action.  The Australian community and health workforce currently accounts for 12% of the country’s entire workforce and employs over 1.35 million workforce throughout Australia.

With Australia’s ageing population, there will be a related increased demand and expectation for demand services;  and recent federal government reforms to promote consumer-directed funding, will drive a marked increase in the demand for care services.  Care services including aged care, mental health, children’s services, disability care and indigenous services will face significant challenges that will not be met if the industry is unable to respond to the changing industry.

Inspirational Conference Speakers – Making an Extra Difference

(Dr) Bob Brown – it is amazing what Bob Brown has achieved in the NFP sector and is a true leader with much to share through his stories.

(Dr) Lois Frankel – an aspiring leader helping women  succeed in work and life.

Chris Kotour – inspirational, challenging speaker and leader in residence from Leadership Victoria. Chris shared her valuable experience and futurist argument of the NFP playing field.

Nick Moraitis – six ways to improve your organisation’s marketing to attract prospective employees. A goldmine full of information.

Kon Karapanagiotidis – no words to describe the achievements of Kon at the Asylum Seeker Resource Centre – it is amazing with over 900 volunteers and counting.

Key Takeaways and Trends

My 3 Top Conference Take-aways:

  • The urgent action required by CEO’s/Boards/HR Managers to engage and start implementing succession planning;
  • Developing women as leaders as 80% of Australia’s community sector workforce are women; and
  • Implementing formal programs to reward and recognise the contribution of volunteers across all generations – Gen Y through to Baby Boomers and Builders.

The Future

This conference has provided the conversation from where the NFP can take direction in meeting the challenges of the future.  Looking forward to next years conference which will build upon the success of the 2103 conference.  Bring it on!

Graphics: Ethical Jobs

About the Author. To fulfil his professional and personal career aspirations, Tony Wiggins created ‘The HR Architect’ brand in 2009.  With a well-grounded focus and passion for HR, he thrives on working across his networks as a thought leader in ‘making a difference’ in the HR arena.

Tony Wiggins is the Founder and UX Editor of Saturday Shoutout!!! and The HR Communique.  Tony utilises the blog ‘The HR Architect’ as a social media network and platform that empowers HR professionals to network, assist and support one another, spanning different countries, subcultures and niches.

Contact Tony at thehrarchitect@optusnet.com.au or @tonywiggin on Twitter.

Saturday Shoutout!!! It’s simple as 1,2,3…

Saturday Shoutout!!! It is simple as 1,2, 3 …

Issue 3 | Number 3 | 30 October 2012

Recognition of doing a good job is something I really appreciate personally and I know we all need recognition.  When I was researching for information, I found this great quote by Spencer Tracy which I believe in…

“It is up to us to give ourselves recognition. If we wait for it to come from others, we feel resentful when it doesn’t, and when it does, we may well reject it.”

So, with this in mind, with today’s workplace focused on productivity, the need of employees to be recognised for their efforts is now greater than ever.  Derek Irvine from the ‘Recognise This’ blog explained that recent survey results show that recognition is a universal desire:

  • 86% of all respondents want to have their efforts/contributions at work recognised.
  • 46% are not satisfied with the level of recognition they receive for doing a good job.
  • These results are quite similar across all generations in the workplace.  And guess what? It’s not Generation Y  who is the most dissatisfied with recognition – its Generation X respondents aged 36-45).

In recent work I completed on a ‘Reward and Recognition Framework’ for a major Children’s Hospital, the ‘Framework’ was a tool to be used by managers and supervisors to send a positive message to employees.  The ‘Framework’ focused on driving cultural change that truly recognised the commitment, hard work and dedication of individuals and teams.  It was not an over-engineered recognition program that would become an exercise in spreadsheets and gift certificates.  By praising staff it would reinforce, recognise and motivate the behaviours expected in delivering services for children, young people and their families in a safe, effective and responsive manner.  The Framework included 3 tiers –                                                                                                                                                                                                                               Tier 1 CEO Awards – ‘The Five Pillars of the Hardwiring Excellence Framework and 2 Commendation Awards for individuals/teams.

Tier 2 Workplace Awards focused on divisional, community or team based awards (formal or informal) that recognised an individual’s special effort.  The Workplace Awards comprised 2 categories – On the Spot Award; and Postcards /eCards e.g. ‘Thank You’, ‘Great Work’, ‘Thanks for being there’, ‘I am glad you are on my team’.

Tier 3 Other Awards – Australian, Queensland Government and Queensland Health Awards to recognise individuals and teams who have demonstrated excellence or exceptional dedication to service in ways that bring special credit to the hospital, their professional or Australia.

I totally believe that a simple ‘thank you’ costs nothing.  Why is the ‘thank you’ award so powerful?  I think that as technology has taken over our lives, people are increasingly starved for the personal touches for doing just a good job.

Finally, thank you to Patty Azzarelloon for these closing words … I am so honoured that so many people read my blog and share it with others. I am very grateful for those of you that have invited me to coach them or speak at conferences where I shared my experiences. And I am very thankful for all the kind words, feedback, and ideas you share with me. Thank you all.

Photo Credit:  ScrewAttack

If you find these updates useful, feel free to forward on to a work colleague or friend.

About the Author                                                                                                                          To fulfil his professional and personal career aspirations, Tony Wiggins created The HR Archit3ct’ brand in 2009. With a well-grounded focus and passion for HR, he thrives on working across his networks as a thought leader in ‘making a difference’ in the HR arena.

Tony Wiggins is the Founder and UX Editor of Saturday Shoutout!!! and The HR Archit3ct Spends 5 Minutes with ….Tony utilises the blog ‘The HR Architect’ as a social media network and platform that empowers HR professionals to network, assist and support one another, spanning different countries, subcultures and niches.

Contact Tony at basketa@optusnet.com.au or @tonywiggin on Twitter.

Saturday Shoutout!!! Performance Management

Saturday Shoutout!!!   Performance Management

Issue 1 | Number 3 | 18 March 2012

Graphics: © 2011 SFGYC.com

This week the discussion focuses on performance management. I hope to share the 5 stories/blogs that show performance management is an essential tool that is relevant at all levels in all organisations.  Generally speaking, it provides a means to improve organisational performance by linking and aligning individual, team and organisational objectives and results and provides a means to recognise and reward good performance and to manage under performance.

Quote of the Week– “The man who starts out going nowhere, generally gets there”- Dale Carnegie author and pioneer in self-improvement and interpersonal skills.

#1 Appraisals v Performance Management, PeopleStreme

Most organisations have some type of employee appraisal or review system and are experiencing the shortcomings of manual Appraisal systems. In talking about Employee Performance Management, the question we are asked most often is “what is the difference between Appraisal systems and Performance Management”

#2 Do Performance Improvement Plans Work? Human Resources iQ

A standard component of most organization’s human resource policies is a Performance Improvement Plan (PIP). This process formalizes the timing, objectives and monitoring expectations for addressing performance issues. There is no denying the necessity of the PIP process from a legal or regulatory standpoint, but does it deliver expected outcomes?

#3 Why We Need to Burn the Annual Performance Appraisal: How to Fix It (Part 1), TLNT.  This is happening way too often and it’s creating employees who are disheartened, disengaged, and waiting for the economy to pick up so that they can find other jobs.  Traditional performance reviews – the way most companies do them – are broken! They don’t work and they cause more harm than good.

#4 10 key elements in creating a high performance culture, Torben Rick

High performance and success are not dependent on one simple factor or as a result of one or two things. The entire context you operate in greatly impacts your results. This context includes the culture of the company – how things get done, how decisions get made, what works and does not work as far …

#5 How You Communicate Performance Is as Important as When and Why, TLNT

It’s annual performance review time for a lot of organizations right now.  This is a frequent topic of conversation within Globoforce as we strongly believe the annual review presents only a fragment of the picture of employee performance told from the point of view of one person. The rest of the story must be told by the people who interact every day with the person being reviewed – their colleagues and peers.

Next week’s blog–  The Ageing Workforce

About the Author                                                                                                                      Tony Wiggins is the Founder and UX Editor of Saturday Shoutout. Tony utilises the blog ‘The HR Architect’ as a social media network and platform that empowers HR professionals to network, assist and support one another, spanning different countries, subcultures and niches.

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